Whisk(e)y Distilleries Need Blogs Too!

Out of a spark of romanticism – and maybe a little curiosity, I decided to take a stroll around the digital block to visit one of my old favourite haunts so to speak  – the Bruichladdich Distillery blog by Mark Reynier. 

I guess I just wanted to see if maybe, just maybe – I just simply missed getting a notification. And that there was maybe one of their trademark funny, often snarky but usually informative blog posts just sitting there waiting to be read. That maybe it had been taken over by someone and was resurrected just like the distillery was in 2000.

Sadly – there wasn’t. There was no notification. There was no blog post.

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Auto-Listening – Is It Possible?

Scotch whisky is widely regarded to be a product of old world traditions.

Well, OK maybe not quite “ancient” traditions – but the the folklore that whisky carries along with it, what with the Scottish stone castles and simple machinery is really not that far off base – and in some cases it’s the old world traditions and stories of old that really make a whisky.

So for me – as a student of the still establishing discipline of social media – its interesting, as a complete whisky nerd and lover, to see how these old world distilleries are stepping up on the front lines of social media as digital representatives of their distilleries.

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Environmentally Sound Distilleries: Lean Mean n’ Green Whisky Machines

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Whisk(e)y seems in essence to be one of the most naturally pure products produced in the world today.

If you think of it – the only ingredients (minus the  possibility of E150A caramel colouring – that’s another post altogether) are water, malted barley, yeast, wood, environment rich air, and of course – time.

Barley FieldSo it’s hard to believe that creating whisky would leave a big environmental footprint.

But the Scotch Whisky industry is very busy producing its glorious nectar for the world – and doing so leaves a sizeable mark.

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Maybe We Love Bourbon Too Much

It’s no secret that good whisk(e)y takes time. Different types take different amounts of time mind you.

In the case of bourbon – it only has to be aged in toasted american oak barrels for 2 years if it is to be called a straight bourbon – but many brands that have armies of loyal subjects commonly age their bourbons for 6-10 years, sometimes more – up to about 23 years.

If you talk to many of these distillers they’ll tell you that you simply can’t rush the interplay between wood and whisk(e)y

Or can you?

Recently Buffalo Trace released a press release announcing that it simply can’t produce enough Bourbon – but they’re trying to!

It seems in the case of Bourbon – America’s most treasured liquid – we’re buying it up faster than they can make it. And this isn’t the first time we’ve heard of these shortages so..I can’t say I’m surprised.

But either way – it’s interesting to see how people squirm when their favorite whiskies are endangered. I – being one of those people.

Join me in helping find a solution! Watch the video here or below and share your examples and ideas!

Bourbonshortage from randy gaudreau on Vimeo.

Top Ten: Whisk(e)y Bottle Designs

Ok – I’ll put out a very clear and simple disclaimer.

This Top 10 list of whisk(e)y bottle designs represents my personal favorite bottle designs based entirely from whisk(e)y bottles I’ve actually either:

  • held in my own two hands (very carefully) or
  • been lucky enough to have enjoyed the wonderful contents from within

So while there’s some fantastic examples out there – this blue-collar, somewhat realistic, under $400 list is not dedicated for them.

However, if you do know of some amazing bottle designs – please feel free to share by commenting below! I’d love to see them!

With all that said – let’s get to it – from starting from number 10 all the way to my opinion on the number one whisk(e)y design. Cheers!

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Transparent Whisk(e)y?

It almost seems odd to mention the words whisk(e)y and Internet in the same sentence.

One adheres to traditions and old world methods that have changed little in hundreds of years – while the other term refers to a new frontier of communication and being connected to information by technology like never before.

glassBut even if it does seem odd – the inevitable meeting between whisk(e)y and the Internet has brought forward an interesting case study.

What happens when the old world of whisk(e)y meets the social media driven community of the Internet? Well, what did happen was an absolute explosion of online content.

High powered content too.

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